No one enjoys delivering bad news. Regardless of the situation, however, it just has to be done, and one of these cases deals with rejection.

Saying no to a job application, a work project, a research proposal, or to people in general is dreaded by all of us. Psychology tells us that people inherently try to steer away from conflicts and other disappointing situations. Because rejection, or saying no, has negative implications and could possibly stoke these flames, many resort to half-hearted yeses or to saying nothing about it.

For the above situations, employers or program heads tend to just keep mum. You may think that applicants would immediately understand the silence, which is really what happens anyway, but not before applicants beat themselves up about what went wrong and not before some anxious waiting. Set them free with the truth, and let these Sample Letters guide you on giving them the closure that they need.

Job Application Rejection Letter

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Job Offer Rejection Letter

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Employment Interview Rejection Letter

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Contract Rejection Letter

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Writing rejection letters is difficult and dreadful. However, the honesty and the closure that it contains are much needed. Learn how to work through one with this post and these samples.

The Format for Rejection Letters

Rejection letters are business letters, and would form part of official records. It should therefore follow the standard business format:

  • preferably on letter, A4, or legal sized bondpapers;
  • printed in black type;
  • with a Times New Roman or Arial font face and 12-pt font size; and
  • with one inch margins on all side of the paper.

If you have a professional letterhead, use it atop the document. Align the name and address of the recipient to the left, justify the body of the letter, and align your name, your signature, and your position to the left as well.

Remember to also use block paragraphs instead of indents. Block paragraphing is when you press “enter” on your keyboard twice at the end of every paragraph.

The Standard Rejection Letter

Basically, every rejection letter should go through the following points:

  • gratitude for the time the applicant has invested into the submission,
  • the rejection of the application,
  • the reason/s for the rejection, and
  • words of hope and encouragement.

More details could be added for the following instances:

  • when you are considering collaboration or work with the applicant in the future, or
  • when you personally know the applicant.

The Job Rejection Letter

Employment applications are the most common situations for which Job Rejection Letters are sent out. Find samples on this post. Other than the standard points, you could add on other listings or potential job openings for which you think the applicant is better suited.

For the people you have already employed, one letter you could find yourself writing would be an employment letter. Employment letters are typically sent to banks and other lending institutions, and it should verify that an individual works for you at this salary, and other such pertinent conditions. For formatting guidelines, see Employment Letter Samples.

Interview Rejection Thank You Letter

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Internship Rejection Letter

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  • DOC

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Leave Application Rejection Letter

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  • DOC

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Sales Proposal Rejection Letter

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  • DOC

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For Applicant Rejection Letters of various purposes—employment, scholarship grants, work projects, or presentations—the most important thing to remember is to be clear and honest with the reason/s for the rejection.

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