Psychology is the academic and applied discipline involving the scientific study of behavior and mental processes. It embraces all aspects of the conscious, subconscious, and the unconscious as well as thoughts and personality. Psychology, although a fairly new field in science, has long been around. It just wore a different mask and evolved from old sciences to become what it is today. While it does struggle with being taken seriously by “hard” sciences, psychology has come to answer questions that man has long been asking.

The four main goals of psychology are to accurately describe, explain, predict, and control human behavior and mental processes within the sphere of human activity. Part of achieving these objectives means that psychologists must also assess the behavior, mental state, or well-being of their clients. See these Sample Assessments and read on for more on psychosocial assessments.

Psychosocial Assessment Example

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Nursing Psychosocial Assessment Example

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HeadSpace Psychosocial Assessment Sample

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Mental Health Psychosocial Assessment in PDF

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Psychosocial Risk Assessment Sample

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Assessment

To assess means to evaluate the nature, quality, or ability of a person, object, or process. Assessments can be used to determine steps that should be taken to train, rehabilitate, or treat. These can be accomplished through Self-Assessment or through a facilitator-participant method.

Psychosocial Psychology

The psychosocial approach in psychology combines the psychological factors of the person and their surrounding social environment as influencers of their physical and mental well-being and ability to function (See Sample Physical Assessments). It is concerned with how one’s relationships with the people around them and their psychological state is related to their overall person.

Psychosocial interventions are one of the treatment plans for aiding those with psychosocial disabilities. Its purpose is to help an individual with mental disorders and/or social problems cope and function as a productive member of the community by addressing both the psychological and social factors causing these problems. An example of a psychosocial intervention would be by referring a patient to a psychiatrist while also recruiting the family’s help for social support at home.

Psychosocial support, or psychological first aid, is the help extended to victims of tragedies, disasters, violence, and catastrophes. It aims to foster psychological and emotional resilience of the community and individuals and attempting to help them resume their normal, everyday life through facilitation of their recuperation and potential traumatic situations.

Child Psychosocial Assessment Form

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Psychosocial Assessment Outline in PDF

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Adolescent Psychosocial Assessment Form

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Psychosocial Assessment

A psychosocial assessment is the evaluation of one’s mental state, social status, and functionability within the community. In other words, a psychosocial assessment is a tool used to evaluate someone’s mental and emotional health as well as a means to understanding their (client’s) role in the family unit.

A psychosocial assessment is often used on elderly patients in care facilities (See also Sample Nursing Assessments); on troubled adults who display symptoms of mental, emotional, and psychological disorders; and on juvenile delinquents.

When conducting a psychological assessment, many factors would determine the success of the assessment. Some of those factors are

  • rapport built with the client;
  • a thorough understanding of the client’s situation;
  • a mental status exam (MSE) that assesses observed and inquired mental capabilities like appearance, behavior, thought processes and such; and
  • a deep and thorough understanding of the client’s medical and psychiatric history.

 

There is more to being a psychologist than listening to someone’s problems. It involves a lot of patience and sacrifice. For more, see our Sample Risk Assessment forms.

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