A good induction should be participatory, with material disseminated in a number of ways, not simply PowerPoint. Be inventive! You should design your induction so that it is adaptable and adapted to the individual’s needs as well as their job function. Induction procedures vary significantly amongst firms, thus what works effectively for a huge, corporate firm may not work for a small, creative firm. The induction process should be well-structured and organized, but it should also allow for flexibility if anything unexpected happens. It’s better to plan for the inductee’s first week, month, and year than than just the first day.

10+ Induction Checklist Samples

An induction checklist is a well-detailed guideline listing the tasks planned for the new employee or contractor, with the goal of ensuring timely coverage of the induction process while avoiding omission or duplication of information. It is an important instrument that has proven to be effective over time. Safety / WHS induction checklists are commonly utilized. A new employee induction, contractor induction, or visitor induction includes an induction checklist.

1. Induction Checklist Template

Details
File Format
  • MS Word
  • Google Docs

Download

2. Job Induction Checklist

Details
File Format
  • PDF

Size: 81 KB

Download

3. Student Induction Checklist

Details
File Format
  • PDF

Size: 32 KB

Download

4. Assistant Induction Checklist

Details
File Format
  • PDF

Size: 19 KB

Download

5. Plant Induction Checklist

Details
File Format
  • PDF

Size: 57 KB

Download

6. Induction Checklist for New Starters

Details
File Format
  • PDF

Size: 517 KB

Download

7. Induction Checklist for Work Experience Student

Details
File Format
  • PDF

Size: 18 KB

Download

8. New Employees Induction Checklist

Details
File Format
  • PDF

Size: 206 KB

Download

9. Health and Safety Induction Checklist

Details
File Format
  • PDF

Size: 302 KB

Download

10. Departmental Induction Checklist for General Staff

Details
File Format
  • PDF

Size: 133 KB

Download

11. Pre Employment Induction Checklist

Details
File Format
  • PDF

Size: 169 KB

Download

What Should a Good Induction Include?

  1. Administrative must-haves – These include things like health and safety, first aid, fire protocols, pay, corporate policies and procedures (including absence reporting, time off requests, grievance and punishment policies, and so on), as well as any papers that need to be filled out. This is the most dry part of the introduction, and it’s easy to overwhelm the employee with material at this point. The material should be made available as a resource for the employee to use whenever they need it and read at their own pace as much as feasible. You may help by properly clarifying forms and setting a deadline for employees to return them.
  2. Introduction to company’s vision, mission, and goals – It’s critical that an induction reflects the corporate culture and provides the employee with a clear image of the organization’s overarching objectives. It improves employee engagement and establishes early expectations for performance, shared values, and company culture. It’s also a good idea to give a quick review of the company’s history and any recent developments, especially if it pertains to their team or area.
  3. Office tour – This is one of my favorite sections of the induction process because it covers some of the most important details, such as where the restrooms and coffee machine are located. There’s nothing worse than needing the restroom on your first day at work but not knowing where it is or being too afraid to ask. If your workplace is vast, a floor plan (ideally with names of who sits where) is really helpful and can be stored on your intranet for convenient access.
  4. Introduction to staff members – During the basic tour, you’ll probably introduce guests to some of the other employees. I would avoid introducing everyone by name unless your company is small, as it is doubtful that the employee will remember everyone. It can also be a little intimidating. Instead, concentrate on describing who works in each sector and possibly introducing them to a group leader. A corporate structure diagram, if one is available, is quite useful in assisting new employees in learning who the important actors are and who they report to.
  5. One-to-one meetings with department heads and co-workers – While an employee will usually get to know their line manager and team members in the first few weeks, it is equally critical that they learn about the other departments and how they will collaborate with them. A one-on-one encounter with a contact person in these other departments will assist them in getting to know people more quickly and provide them with a direct source of information or assistance. While some people are quite adept at getting out of their chair and going to meet other people in the organization, this is not the case for everyone, and including this part in the induction process will greatly benefit your new hires.
  6. Training – This includes role-specific training, as well as general office and IT training. It should also cover how to operate the telephone system and common office applications. Obviously, not all training will occur on the first day, or even the first week, but anything that the employee will need to know right away should be covered as quickly as feasible.
  7. Plan for first week in the role – Even if it’s a flexible method, having a plan in place for your first week at a new work is reassuring. It benefits not only the new employee, but it also assists other employees in sticking to the plan and remembering to perform their part. Setting expectations with their line manager about what they will be working on in the first week will not only help set expectations, but it will also allow the employee to ask any questions they may have about the task.
  8. Special welcome – In the first week of a new employee’s employment, it’s common to organize a team or business lunch. This has the added benefit of helping the new employee to get to know their team better, as well as giving current employees something to anticipate. At company and team meetings, don’t forget to introduce new personnel.

FAQs

Why do you have to prepare your staff?

It’s critical to devote the same amount of time to preparing current employees, particularly those who will be involved in the induction process, for the coming of a new worker. They will not only deliver a better induction if they are well prepared, but having a team ready to welcome someone new is preferable to a team that is astonished when someone new arrives! Staff, especially those from different teams, should be encouraged to come and say hi during the day to help the new starting feel at ease.

What are the common objectives of an induction checklist?

– To provide new employees and contractors with an overview of the company or organization, including its history, values, and vision, structure, facilities, and long- and short-term goals.

– For new employees, to facilitate a smoother transition; this will allow the individual to become more productive in their job sooner.

– It provides an overview of the firm’s policies and processes, operational methods, company products and services, and so on for contractors and workers.

– Ensuring that both employees and contractors read and comprehend key safety materials before beginning their job assignment or activity.

If you want to see more samples and formats, check out some induction checklist samples and templates provided in the article for your reference.

Related Posts